Entries tagged “launch.”

Colorpeek for Chrome (and on CSS-Tricks)

Hey, remember Colorpeek, my web app for quickly sharing and previewing colors? Well, good news: I just released an accompanying Chrome extension that makes the creation of palettes from text, webpages or images even easier!

I’m honored to announce the extension in an article I wrote for CSS-Tricks, one of my favorite blogs and an indispensable resource for any self-respecting web designer. Stay tuned for Part Two, which will walk through the process of making your own simple Chrome extension. (Update: Part Two is now available!)

And if you use Chrome and dig Colorpeek, try the darn extension already!

Meet Colorpeek, a simple way to share and preview colors

When Tim Sears and I were almost done making Lotsa Blocks, we decided it might be fun to change the color of the blocks for seasonal holidays. Christmas blocks would be red and green, halloween blocks black and orange, etc.

Once I finished designing one of these color palettes in Illustrator, I had to send it to Tim. So I did what a lot of designers do: I threw together an image showing the colors and their corresponding hex values.

This worked fine, but the process was tedious for me to create and for Tim to reference (especially when he needed to convert them to RGB notation). I wanted a way to quickly and easily share colors without numerous steps, ongoing maintenance or even account creation.

I found a lot of great color-related apps (COLOURlovers, Palettee, color.hailpixel.com), but none that did exactly what I wanted.

So I made one. It’s called Colorpeek.

Now I can send Tim a link to the colors I want: colorpeek.com/#a899f2,dd4e85,4dc45e,6da7e8

And if he needs RGB, it’s as easy as tapping or clicking the cog icon and changing the notation.

 Colorpeek will accept just about any CSS color value, including hex (triplet or shorthand), RGB, RGBA, HSL and HSLA. It will convert color keywords like indigo or lightslategray to hex. It also supports many brand colors as keywords, so you can easily add facebook, android or wordpressorange to your palettes.

This being a 1.0 release, I tried hard to include only features I find to be critical. I hope to add more things from my list of “wants” to future iterations (copy to clipboard, transitions/animations, color picker, color editing, palette export options, to name a few).

If you have ideas for making Colorpeek better while retaining its simplicity, please let me know.

I want to thank Marc Roman for designing the Colorpeek logo, Erik Jung for helping me learn Knockout, my Cloud Four teammates for their support, encouragement and access to the device lab, and everyone who offered feedback or advice for my little side project.

You can follow me and/or @Colorpeek on Twitter for updates.

Lotsa Blocks, my second game for iOS, is available now!

Man, what a crazy year! I got married, started a new opportunity and, as of today, launched the second game from Backabit, Lotsa Blocks. You can buy it for your iPhone or iPad right now!

We started working on Lotsa Blocks around the time we were finishing the universal update for Ramps. Our intention was to make this a much smaller game, something we could finish in about three months. Once we got into it, we were having too much fun to hold ourselves back! In the end, I designed about 278% more design assets for Lotsa Blocks than I did for Ramps. This one really stretched my cartooning muscles! You can take a peek at that process on Dribbble.

Like Ramps, we really made this game for ourselves, but that doesn’t mean we don’t want others to dig it. Please give it a try and let us know what you think.

If you’d like to see the game in action and hear a bit of the thought that went into it, Tim posted this nifty hands-on video on the Backabit blog earlier this week:

Ramps is the iPhone Game of the Week

I am completely speechless.

Wait a minute, not completely. Backabit, the indie game company Tim Sears and I formed to release Ramps for iPhone, has a blog. You can read about our Apple feature there. You should probably subscribe so you can keep tabs on Backabit news, process sketches, videos, and other fun content.

Introducing Portwiture: Your Twitter status, in photos

portwiture_mascotTwitter (a mass-messaging service) and Flickr (a photo-sharing community) are both stunning examples of audience-powered communication. One thing they both have in common: open APIs.

I hadn’t experimented yet with either interface, so I thought to myself: “Why not try both at once?”

The result is Portwiture, a little jQuery-powered web app that finds and displays Flickr photos based on the most common words in your last twenty tweets.

Typically I start my projects with a problem to solve. Portwiture is the product of a more artistic temperament, created out of the simple desire to see what would happen.

So go see what happens, and let me know what should happen next on the UserVoice forum or in the comments. Dig it!